The Green and Golden Bell Frog at Arncliffe

Photo of two mating Arncliffe Green and Golden Bell Frogs by Grant Webster

The Green and Golden Bell Frog (often abbreviated to GGBF) has a conservation status of "Endangered" in NSW and "Vulnerable" in Australia (source: NSW Government Office of Environment and Heritage). There are very few populations left in Sydney and one is in Arncliffe, mostly on a golf course next to International Airport and operated by Kogarah Golf Club. Recently the GGBF has also been observed south of the golf course (source: Bionet Atlas of NSW Wildlife).

This site is not about the GGBF generally but only about the Arncliffe population. Here is just a little bit of information about the GGBF (source: Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW) 2008, Management Plan for the Green and Golden Bell Frog Key Population on the lower Cooks River. Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW), Sydney and Australian Government - Department of the Environment and Energy - Species Profile and Threats Database).

The GGBF grows up to 10cm long, snout to vent (end of body). The GGBF breeds in water. The water must not be too polluted, too salty or too shaded. The water must not be fast-flowing, so ponds are good. The GGBF is vulnerable to certain types of fish, such as the mosquito fish which eats the tadpoles. The GGBF forages in grasses, reeds and similar vegetation.

Why a web site for the Arncliffe GGBF? Because the survival of the species at its current site is not assured.